New home

Abraham’s faithful servant and his men had their fill of food and wine, and in the morning they prepared to leave. Laban and the girl’s mother said, “Let Rebekah wait at least ten days. Then she can go to meet Isaac.”

“Don’t make me wait,” the man said. “God has made my journey a success, and now I must get back.”

“Let’s call Rebekah in,” Laban replied, “and ask what she wants to do.”

Rebekah said she was ready and willing to go, so they gave their blessing. “May you become thousands upon thousands of people, and may your descendants conquer the world!”

Rebekah, her maids, and her nurse all mounted their camels and followed Abraham’s servant with his men toward the horizon.

Isaac had recently returned to his home in the Negev from Beerlahairoi and was meditating in the field one evening. Looking up, he noticed a caravan of camels approaching.

When Rebekah looked up and saw Isaac, she hurriedly dismounted and said to the servant of Abraham, “Who is that man coming toward us?”

The servant answered, “It’s my master’s son.”

Rebekah veiled her face upon Isaac’s approach, and the servant relayed to him everything that had transpired in his absence.

Isaac brought Rebekah into his deceased mother’s tent, and they were married. Isaac was forty years old at this time, and he found comfort in Rebekah’s arms.

In the meantime, Abraham married Keturah and had several children by her. Although he gave gifts to the sons of his concubines, he sent them all away toward the east. To Isaac, he gave everything he owned.

Abraham lived for a hundred and seventy-five years. His sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him with his wife Sarah in the cave that he had purchased from Ephron.

After Abraham died, God blessed Isaac, who settled in Beerlahairoi.

Inspiration: Genesis 24, 25

Cruel mistress

Sarai heard Abram often talk of fathering a great nation. She wanted to pave the way for God’s promise to be fulfilled for Abram, so she suggested Abram should sleep with her Egyptian slave, Hagar.

Abram tossed the idea around for about a decade, until Sarai pressed the issue, bringing Hagar personally into his tent. When Hagar got pregnant, she hurled insults at Sarai and adopted an air of superiority over her.

Sarai flew into a rage, and Abram took the brunt of her wrath. “I offered you my slave as a second wife,” she seethed, “and she became a monster. What are you going to do about it?”

“She’s your slave,” Abram shrugged half-heartedly, “and this was your idea. Take care of the situation however you wish.”

On that very day, Sarai’s treatment of Hagar became so unbearable that the slave fled into the wilderness.

An angel of God approached Hagar as she followed a brook toward Egypt. “Hagar, where’d you come from?” the angel asked. “And where are you going?”

The slippery rocks on the creek bottom made the way difficult, but she continued along the path undeterred. “I’m escaping the cold, cruel grip of my mistress.”

The angel stepped in front of Hagar, blocking her way. “Turn around,” the angel said. “Go back and submit to Sarai. In return, I’ll give you more descendants than a census can track.”

Hagar dropped to her knees and held her belly. “How can I go back to that abusive woman?” she sighed, rocking in place.

The angel of God knelt beside her and said, “Your son will be named Ishmael because God hears your cries of anguish. But you should know, Ishmael will make an ass of himself and will have enemies all around him, including his own family.”

“I’ll call you Elroi,” Hagar said, suddenly still, “because I’ve seen God and will live to tell about it.”

After the encounter, the well of the spring was called “Beerlahairoi,” Well of the Living Sight.

Hagar returned to her mistress, bore a son, and named him Ishmael. Abram turned eighty-six years old.

Inspiration: Genesis 16