Selecting wives

Esau hated Jacob for the wholesale robbery of their father’s blessing, and he was often heard mumbling his plan of revenge.

“After Father dies and I’ve mourned his death, I’ll snuff out that thief in the night and take back what’s mine by right.”

Rebekah heard Esau’s venomous pronouncements, so she called for Jacob. “Run to your uncle Laban’s house in Haran,” she said, “and stay there until Esau’s anger has subsided. When your offense is no more than a distant memory, I’ll send a messenger for you. Don’t make me mourn the loss of my husband and my beloved son at the same time.”

Then Rebekah insisted that Isaac have a heart to heart with Jacob about a wife.

“These Hittite women make me want to puke,” she complained. “If Jacob marries one, I see no reason to live.”

So Isaac sat his younger son down and said, “Look, don’t marry a Canaanite. Instead, go to Grandpa Bethuel’s house and find a wife among Laban’s daughters. God’ll give you the family blessing, numberless descendants and all the real estate you could ever want.”

After hearing from both of his parents, and seeing they were in agreement for once, Jacob left for Haran to find his uncle, Laban.

In the meantime, after having overheard the part of the conversation about not marrying a Canaanite, and realizing his wives disgraced his parents, Esau went to visit his uncle, Ishmael. While there, he took Ishmael’s daughter Mahalath, also called Basemath, as a wife in addition to his foreign wives, Judith, Adah, and Oholibamah.

Inspiration: Genesis 27-28

Rebekah’s home

After the camels had had their fill, Abraham’s servant took a gold nose ring and two gold bracelets from his satchel and gave them to Rebekah. “Who’s your father?”

“Bethuel, son of Nahor, born of Milcah,” the girl answered.

“Is there room in his house to spend the night?” he asked.

“We have plenty of room and provisions for you and your camels.”

The man bowed and said, “Blessed be the God of Abraham. For the love of my master, he led me straight to Abraham’s family!”

Rebekah ran ahead and told her mother and their household what had happened at the well. Rebekah’s brother, Laban, listened intently, his eyes regarding the exquisite nose ring and bracelets adorning his sister’s body. When Rebekah finished her story, Laban ran out to meet the visitor and his camels at the well. Sure enough, the man was standing as if waiting for another sign.

“You, there, blessed of God,” Laban shouted. “Why are you standing out here while we’ve prepared our home for you and your animals?”

The servant went to the home of Bethuel, and Laban gave the camels straw and fodder for the night. The household welcomed their guest and his men, giving them water for their feet and food to eat.

After washing his feet, the servant said, “I won’t eat until I’ve shared with you the purpose of my visit here.”

“Go ahead then,” Laban said.

“I call from Abram, now called Abraham,” he said. “God’s been good to my master, giving him flocks, herds, gold, silver, slaves, camels, and donkeys.”

The man stood up. “Abraham’s wife, Sarah, bore him a son in her old age, and my master has lavished everything on him. He made me promise that I wouldn’t choose a wife for him among the Canaanites. Instead, he told me to go to his old country to find a suitable wife.”

The man walked over to where Rebekah was sitting and turned to her. “I asked my master, ‘What if she won’t follow me.’ Abraham said, ‘God will send a guiding angel who’ll lead you to success. If she doesn’t follow you, I free you from your promise.’”

Rebekah smiled.

“Today I came to the well and prayed that whomever I ask for a drink, his chosen one would offer me water along with my animals. Before I finished my prayer, Rebekah approached with her water pitcher.”

As the man recounted the events of the day, the household listened with great interest, especially Laban, who couldn’t keep his eyes off of the gold jewelry adorning his sister. The man finished, saying, “If all this pleases you, let me know. Otherwise, I must continue my search for Isaac’s bride.”

Bethuel answered, “If you’re with God, who are we to argue? Here’s Rebekah to take with you as God wills it.”

The visitor bowed to the ground. Then he went back to his satchel and brought out more jewelry of both gold and silver. Laban watched, wide-eyed, as the servant handed them to Rebekah along with several quality garments. Then he brought out costly gifts for Laban and their mother.

Inspiration: Genesis 24

God provides

One day, God dealt Abraham an untenable command. “Take Isaac, whom you love, and offer him as a human sacrifice on a mountain I’ll show you in Moriah.”

Abraham got up early from a restless night’s sleep and woke his son. He saddled a donkey and cut up some wood for a burnt offering. Taking a couple of servants with him, Abraham and his son headed north for Moriah. After three days of travel, he looked out and saw the place God had designated for the altar.

“Stay here with the donkey and supplies,” Abraham told his servants. “Isaac and I will go up, worship, and then return.” Abraham gave the wood to his son, while he carried the lighted firepot and the knife. They walked together up the steep hill to the place of worship.

“Father,” Isaac called out as they walked along. “We have fire and wood, but where is the lamb for our offering?”

“God himself will bring the lamb, son,” Abraham said, a lump welling in his throat. They continued to walk on together. “God always provides for the faithful.”

When they reached the right spot, Abraham built an altar and arranged the wood accordingly. Next, he bound his son and lifted him up onto the platform.

Abraham brought the sharp knife close to the boy’s throat for a quick, clean cut, and with tears searing his face, an angel from God called out from the sky. “Abraham!”

Abraham halted, the knife tremoring in his hand. “Here I am,” he ejaculated.

“Don’t harm the boy in any way,” he answered. “I know now that you fear God since you’ve withheld nothing you treasure.”

Abraham cut the cords that bound his son and wiped the tears from his bloodshot eyes. He looked up and spotted a ram, its horns tangled in a thicket. Taking the animal, he put it onto the woodpile in place of his son and offered it up as a sacrifice to God.

For the remainder of the time they worshiped on the mountain, and neither Abraham nor Isaac spoke. Amidst the smoke and silence, the angel called out. “God promises by his own name that because you’ve been obedient and not withheld your treasure from me, I will absolutely bless you and make your family as numerous as the stars in the sky. They will conquer their enemies, and by them, all nations will be blessed.”

Abraham and his beloved son returned to the servants who were camping below, unaware of the profound experience both men of God received. In the morning they got up and traveled down to Beersheba.

Abraham settled there, and word reached him that his brother Nahor became the father of eight sons, of whom, Bethuel became the father of a little girl named Rebekah.

Inspiration: Genesis 22