Benjamin’s portion

After they had washed their feet and quenched their thirst, the brothers were led into a large dining hall, more lavish than the meeting hall.

Reuben took from his bag all the gifts Israel told the brothers to present to the lord, Zaphenath.

When Zaphenath entered with his guards and servants, the brothers bowed low to the ground and presented their gifts of gum, resin, nuts, balm, and honey. A servant gathered up the commodities on an oblong tray and left with the platter stacked high.

“We accept your gifts. Sit, sit,” Zaphenath said through his interpreter. He leaned forward with a hand on his knee. “How’s your father? Is he well?”

The brothers sat at the table, taken aback by the lord’s courtesy and his concern over their father’s well-being.

“Your servant Israel is alive and well, my lord,” Reuben answered.

Zaphenath walked over to Benjamin and looked into his eyes.

“You must be the youngest son of Israel,” he said, quirking an eyebrow and smiling. “God’s grace be upon you, son.”

Zaphenath turned away abruptly and left the hall. As he exited, tears gushed from his eyes. Great affection welled within him as he cried in a private chamber for several minutes.

Then he washed his face, composed himself, and re-entered the hall. “Serve us our meal!” he ordered. Servants from every corner of the room who had been standing in wait for the master’s orders served the brothers a feast fit for kings. At a separate table, the Egyptian household ate, and Zaphenath sat alone.

After everyone had their fill, the brothers were assigned seats before the great lord, in order by birthright. Reuben sat to Zaphenath’s left, and Benjamin took the position at his right hand. The brothers were astonished by this and looked at one another as if to ask, “How did he know?”

The servants brought in decadent cakes and set them before the guests, but Benjamin’s portion was five times larger than any of his brothers.

Wine flowed liberally into the afternoon.

Inspiration: Genesis 43

Warm reception

Zaphenath greeted the travelers as they made their way into the courtyard, and he instantly recognized the eyes of his mother in the face of Benjamin. He called for his steward and said, “These men will dine with me at noon. Escort them into the house, and prepare a feast, sparing no expense.”

The steward followed his orders, and the brothers found themselves in a large chamber with high ceilings. Its walls were adorned with color drawings of battle scenes, harvest festivals, and royal weddings. Three servants came in, dressed in loincloths, each carrying a bowl of water and a towel. Two more servants followed with a pitcher of water and cups. They all smelled strongly of incense.

Judah lifted a foot tentatively as a servant cradled his heel in his hand and began wiping off the dust. He whispered to Reuben. “Is this a trap?”

Reuben shrugged, his eyes watching the entrance to the room. He looked into his cup and gave it a sniff before taking a sip. It was pure water, refreshing to the taste.

“It’s about the money,” Judah said, his eyes blinking rapidly. “He brought us here to make us slaves.”

Seeing the steward come in, Reuben approached him. “Lord, there’s been a misunderstanding,” he began to explain. “We paid for grain on our first trip, but after we left the city to return home, we found that we still had every shekel in our possession.” Then motioning to a large sack he had brought in, he said, “We’ve brought the money back in addition to money for more grain.”

The steward put up a hand. “Relax, your God must have worked some good magic. I got your money on the first visit.”

At that moment, Simeon walked in, unchained. He looked as mean as usual but relatively healthy. “Hello, brothers,” he said with a mischievous smile. “Did you miss me?”

“Now, when you’re finished here, we’ll adjourn to the dining hall,” the steward said, clapping Reuben on the back. “Your donkeys are already feasting in my barns.”

Inspiration: Genesis 43