Welfare system

After Israel and his family had settled, and Joseph provided everything they needed from his own house, he went back to the business of rationing his stores of grain for the rest of the people in the land.

The famine devastated Egypt and Canaan entirely until no food could be found anywhere. Joseph began to collect all the money down to the last hoarded shekel, and he brought it in cargo loads into Pharaoh’s house. In exchange, he provided the people the grain they so desperately needed to survive.

The priests were not included in this bargain, as they subsisted on a food allowance from Pharaoh and would never want for anything for as long as the dynasty had the means to provide.

When the rest of Egypt ran out of grain and had no money to pay for it, they came crawling back to Joseph. “Please, for the love of Pharaoh,” they pleaded, “give us something to eat. What good is a mummified kingdom? You must save us!”

“Your livestock for grain,” Joseph decreed.

The people, having no other alternative, brought their beasts of burden, their flocks, and herds, and they exchanged them all for a year’s supply of food.

The next year, the Egyptian people came back to beg once more. “We have no money, and we have no cattle. What’s left of your servants except for our bodies and our lands? What good is a dynasty of corpses? Take our farms and fields from us, and let us become your slaves to work the land.”

Joseph answered, “Let it be as you say,” and he purchased every acre in Egypt for Pharaoh. From east to west, every landowner became slaves on the very ground they used to possess.

Joseph parceled seed in every area for the slaves of Egypt to sow. “At harvest,” the viceroy commanded, “you’ll bring me one-fifth of your yield. Four-fifths will be yours for food and for seed.”

The people were all too glad to abide by their master’s commands, for they owed their lives to him. The worst of the famine had passed, and the skies began to show signs of reprieve.

All the while, Pharaoh’s priests never misses a meal, and Joseph’s father, chosen by God to lay the foundation of a great promise, had plenty of food to provide for his people in the fertile land of Goshen.

Inspiration: Genesis 47

Pharaoh blessed

“My family has traveled from Canaan with everything they own and are now grazing their flocks in Goshen,” Joseph said to Pharaoh. He had five of his brothers with him.

Pharaoh sat silently for a moment, taking in the drastic contrast in appearance and visage between his guests and their brother, his most trusted ally in all of Egypt.

“What is your trade?” Pharaoh asked the one with the grayest beard.

“Your servants are herdsmen, my lord,” Reuben said, bowing low to the ground. “Our fathers were herdsmen, as were their fathers before them.”

Pharaoh nodded. “And why have you come to Egypt?”

“We’ve come as strangers in your land to live here, “Reuben continued. “The famine has decimated our grazing lands, so your servants seek our Lord’s permission to settle in Goshen, where the water is plentiful, and the pastures are lush and green.”

Pharaoh turned to Joseph. “Your father and brothers are in your care, and Egypt is yours. Settle your family and their flocks in Goshen, where the richest soil in the land will provide for all your needs.” Then to Reuben, “And if any among you are skilled enough, put my livestock in their charge.”

Joseph smiled, knowing his brothers learned their trade from the most prosperous shepherd in all of Canaan.

As Reuben bowed once again in respect to the great god of Egypt who had just given them their lives back, Joseph brought his father in.

“My lord, I present to you the greatest herdsman in all the land, my father, Israel.” Joseph led Jacob by the arm, and they approached the throne. “Allow my father to put his hand on your head and bless you, for he is a man of God.”

Pharaoh descended the steps of the throne and knelt before Israel to be blessed. “How old are you?” Pharaoh asked.

“I’m one hundred and thirty years old,” Israel said. “Brief and difficult has been my life, but nothing in comparison to the years of my ancestors during their journey on our shared path of destiny. We are but pilgrims in a strange land until we reach home.”

Jacob’s blessed Pharaoh, and then he left with his sons to settle in Goshen, the land of Rameses.

Joseph opened his stores of grain to his family according to their number.

Inspiration: Genesis 47

Israel’s God

Jacob caught up with his family just in time to see a retinue of men coming toward him. Quickly he divided his children up with their respective mothers and lined them in groups. The maids and their children made up the front of the line, Leah and her children were in the middle, and Rachel and Joseph were at the back.

Then he went on ahead of them all, alone and unarmed. As he approached Esau, he bowed low to the ground seven times.

When Esau recognized his brother, he ran to him and hugged him. Together they both cried. Esau saw the approaching caravan. “Who’s with you?” he asked.

“These are my children, given to your servant by a gracious God.”

As each group drew near, they bowed before Esau. He regarded each of them with a nod and turned again to Jacob.

“What’s the meaning of the endless train of livestock that came before you?” Esau asked.

Jacob took a knee. “To find favor in your eyes, master,” he answered.

Esau offered his hand to his brother and lifted him up. “I’ve got more than enough, brother. Keep your property.”

“No, master,” Jacob pleaded. “If we’re at peace, accept what I offer as a sign. Seeing you after these many years is like seeing God face to face, especially since you receive me with such kindness.”

Esau accepted Jacob’s gift and said, “Let’s go home together.”

But Jacob hesitated. “Master, you know my children are small, as well as the suckling young of my flocks and herds. Please go on ahead, and I’ll travel at a slower pace for their safety. I’ll meet you in Seir.”

Very well,” Esau agreed. “But let me leave some of my people with you.”

“You’re too kind,” Jacob said, “but no, I cannot accept.”

“Very well,” Esau again relented. “See you soon.” And Esau went south and returned home to Seir.

Jacob, on the other hand, traveled west and built a little house with stables for his livestock. That place was named “Succoth,” Stables. Then moving across the Jordan River, he settled outside Shechem in Canaan. He bought a piece of land with a hundred pieces of silver and pitched his tent.

Then he built an altar to God and called it “El-Elohe-Israel,” God, the God of Israel.

Inspiration: Genesis 33

Peace train

When Jacob had moved to Haran twenty years earlier, Esau had also moved away from his father’s house. He had taken his wives, children, livestock, and possessions, and settled in the hill country of Seir. Now, as Jacob and his entourage drew closer to his brother, he decided to dispatch couriers ahead of them to seek peace with Esau.

When Jacob’s messengers arrived, they said to Esau, “Your servant Jacob has been living with your Uncle Laban until recently. He now has oxen, donkeys, sheep, and slaves, and he sent us in hopes that you’ll receive him on friendly terms.”

“Tell Jacob,” Esau answered, “that I’m coming to meet him with an army of four hundred.”

When they returned and told Jacob what Esau had said, Jacob was terrified. He split his camp into two companies and divided his livestock equally so that half of his estate could still survive the wrath of Esau.

Then he prayed. “O God, O Master, you told me to go back home, and you said you’d be with me. I went to Haran with a shepherd’s crook and a father’s blessing, and now I’m a wealthy man. I’m not worthy of your love and faithfulness, but I ask that you save my family and me from my brother’s anger. You said you’d make my offspring like the countless sands of the shore.”

Jacob continued to pray into the night until he fell asleep. The next morning, he brought out two hundred female goats and twenty male goats, gave them to a servant and said, “Deliver these goats to my brother and say, ‘These are a peace offering from your servant Jacob, and he is coming behind us.’”

Then he took two hundred ewes and twenty rams from his flock. He gave them to another servant and told him the same thing he told the first servant, adding, “Keep space between you and my servant ahead of you.”

Next, he took thirty milking camels and their young, forty cows and ten bulls, twenty female donkeys, and ten male donkeys. Again he gave each species of animal to a servant and had him form the next drove in a long line of gifts for his brother. “Tell him your servant Jacob comes behind us,” he told each one, “but keep a distance between the drove ahead of you.”

Jacob hoped that by the time he met his brother Esau, his anger would have subsided. In the meantime, he waited for each drove to take its turn toward Esau, and he continued to sleep unsettled for another night.

Inspiration: Genesis 32, 36