Dinah’s avengers

When Leah’s daughter Dinah went out to visit the women in the area, the prince of Shechem noticed her. After grabbing her in the street and brutally raping her, he decided instead that he loved her. So he helped her to her feet and spoke gently to console her.

Later that day, the prince demanded of his father Hamor, “I want her as my wife!”

Word got back to Jacob that his daughter had been sexually assaulted, but since his sons were working with the cattle, he brooded all alone. When Hamor came out to speak with Jacob, the sons were also returning from the field. When they heard from Jacob what had happened, they were outraged by the offense done to a daughter of Israel.

Hamor tried to bargain with them. “My son longs for Dinah,” he said. “Please give her as his wife. For that matter, why not marry our daughters, and let us marry yours. Our land will be yours in which to buy, sell, and trade freely.”

The prince showed up and offered himself to them. “I come in peace,” he said. “Whatever you ask of me, I will grant it to you. Consider it my wedding gift. I must have her as my wife.”

“Wedding gift?” Simeon stammered. “You’re prostituting our—”

“The price will be impossibly high,” Jacob interrupted. “We can’t give our daughters to an uncircumcised people.”

The prince and Hamor stood silently before Jacob and his sons.

“But,” Levi spoke up, “on the condition that both of you, as well as every male in your town, cut off their foreskins, our sister will be yours to marry.”

“And our daughters will be yours,” Simeon added. “Yours will be ours. We’ll become one people.”

“And these wide, open spaces will be ours to share,” Levi said.

“Otherwise, we’ll take our daughters and move on,” Jacob said, doubting they’d take such audacious conditions seriously.

But the prince and his father Hamor agreed. The young prince was so eager for the love of his betrothed that he had Jacob do the honors right then and there.

Hamor and the prince went to the city gate and relayed to the men of Shechem all that had been discussed with the tribe of Israel. “If we do this thing,” the prince reasoned, “will not their property and livestock be ours?”

Every male who was present agreed to the circumcision by leaving the city gate. Jacob and his sons were on the other side, sharpening their knives.

After two days, and while every male of the city was still sore, Simeon and Levi entered the gates in long cloaks. One by one, they raided each house brandishing swords, and they slew their hapless enemies.

“This is for Dinah,” they’d say, as the cold steel cut through each male’s flesh. Finally, they reached the house of the prince, where he and his father were lying in recovery. Simeon and Levi entered, each standing over their victim.

“As our father said,” Levi sneered as both brothers raised their swords, “the price for Dinah is impossibly high.”

After slaughtering Hamor and his rapist son, they collected Dinah and her belongings and left.

The rest of Jacob’s sons came in behind Dinah’s avengers and plundered the city on Dinah’s behalf. They took flocks, herds, donkeys, everything of value, and they captured their women and children for their own devices.

Jacob was distraught by the news of Shechem’s demise. “You’ve made me an enemy to all my neighbors,” he said. “You’ve slaughtered these Hivites. If the Canaanites and Perizzites come together against me, we’ll all be destroyed.”

Simeon said, “You’d rather our sister be treated like a whore?”

Levi muttered under his breath, “Is this not where God first promised this land to our great-grandfather Abraham?”

Inspiration: Genesis 34

Fourteen years

“Just because we’re family,” Laban told Jacob, “doesn’t mean you work for free. How shall I pay you?”

“Funny you should ask,” Jacob answered. Laban had two daughters, Leah and Rachel, and although Jacob was embarrassingly aware that he had come without a dowry, his heart belonged to Rachel.

Customarily, the eldest daughter would have been married off first. But in this case, the eldest’s eyes were somewhat zombie-like and unattractive, while Rachel’s sparkled. Rachel was a picture of beauty, grace, and radiance.

“I’ll work for you for seven years for Rachel’s hand in marriage,” Jacob said.

Laban agreed. That would surely give some other suitor ample time to come and take Leah. “It’s better for Rachel to be with you than any other man,” he said.

Jacob stayed with Laban’s household for seven years, watching over his flocks, herds, and lands. Because Jacob loved Rachel, it seemed only a few days had passed.

After completing his part of the promise, Jacob came to Laban to fetch his prize. “My time here is finished, as you know. I’m ready to make Rachel my wife.”

“Very well.” Laban invited everyone in the vicinity to celebrate at the wedding feast. After much dining, singing, and dancing, the sun retired. Laban brought his daughter Leah to Jacob, and Jacob, being full of wine, went to bed with her.

In the morning, Jacob realized what had happened. He asked Laban, “Why did you do this to me? I became a seven-year servant for Rachel.”

“You know our custom,” Laban answered. “We give our firstborn to be married first.”

Laban had also become rich while Jacob managed his affairs, so he wasn’t in a hurry to be rid of him. “Finish this week of celebration, and I’ll give you Rachel as a wife also. The only condition is that you serve me for another seven years.”

So Jacob and Leah finished their week of celebration, and Rachel was presented to Jacob as well.

As Jacob began his second stretch of the indenture, God saw that Leah was unloved. He, therefore, gave Leah the ability to become pregnant, while Rachel suffered barrenness. Leah had four sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah.

After Judah was born, Jacob’s visits became infrequent.

Inspiration: Genesis 29

Mythos rising

This story begins at the end of a brooding and desolate night.

The God Elohim hovered over the vast and shapeless abyss. After a long breath, He uttered the first word:

“Light.”

A brilliant shaft aroused the sleeping void, and like a searchlight, it illuminated an ancient battle scene. Here God crushed the head of the watery dragon Chaos and pierced the spirit of the raging flood.

From out of the storm, He lifted a bright, blue canvass that shrouded the earth-in-flux like a dome, its four corners meeting to create the axes of a cross. This airy sphere separated the waters of the chaotic underworld from the secret courts of the heavens.

Lands formed as God cut boundaries into the waterways, and a lush garden sprung with vibrant colors from the banks of a crystalline river.

Thick vegetation blanketed the dry land in every direction, and two large trees flanked the tributary. They tangled into an arch at their crown, forming a bridge over the flowing water.

These were the Life Tree and the Knowledge Tree, and they dwarfed all other plants.

“Good,” God said as He hurled the sun, moon, and an array of luminaries across the sky. “This is all good.”

He created sea creatures, land creatures, sky creatures, engineering each to multiply by instinct across the land and sea. Insects hummed, mammals groaned, and an assembly of new life vibrated a symphony of praise into the far and outer reaches of space.

Then God made a strange creature like Himself and placed him in the middle of the garden beneath the crosshatched shadows of the high trees. Like the animals before him, Adam rose mightily from the mist-moistened clay. But unlike other creatures he was given a spirit, animated by the very breath of God.

“This is very good.”

God gave His supreme achievement dominion over the hierarchical realms of the new world. Adam named every species, cataloged the stars, tilled the land, and established order. He had full run of the place, but something was amiss.

Considering Adam’s milieu, God caused him to fall into a deep sleep, seized a portion of clay from his body, and fashioned with it another creature like Himself.

Upon waking, the son of God looked upon his equal with immense pleasure.

“Now that’s what I call a woman.” As their bodies intersected, his loneliness was satiated. The first king and queen ruled their kingdoms together without self-awareness, without shame.

God took inventory of everything He had made, and seeing it was all right, He rested.

Inspiration: Genesis 1-2, Psalm 74:12-17, Isaiah 51:9-10