Cruel mistress

12 cruel mistress

Abram and Sarai had no children of their own. Sarai wanted to pave a way for God’s promise to be fulfilled for Abram, so she suggested that Abram sleep with her Egyptian slave, Hagar.

“Since God has prevented me from giving you children,” she reasoned, “perhaps I can have a child through her.”

Abram considered this, and after they had lived in Canaan for ten years, Sarai brought Hagar into Abram’s bed. When Hagar got pregnant, she hurled insults at Sarai and behaved with an air of superiority.

Sarai lit into her husband. “May the tables turn on you! I offered you my slave as a second wife, and she became a monster. May God be the judge between us.”

Abram deflected. “She’s your slave. Take care of the situation however you wish.”

On that very day, Sarai’s treatment of Hagar became so unbearable that the slave escaped and ran away into the wilderness.

An angel of God approached Hagar as she trudged along a spring toward Egypt. “Hagar, where’d you come from?” the angel asked. “And where are you going?”

Continuing along the path undeterred, she answered, “I’m getting away from my cruel mistress.”

The angel stepped in front of Hagar, stopping her in her tracks. “Turn around,” the angel said. “Go back and submit to Sarai. As a reward, I’ll give you more descendants than a census can track.”

Hagar dropped to her knees and held her belly. How could she go back to that abusive woman?

The angel of God knelt beside her and said, “Your son will be named Ishmael, because God hears your pain. However, Ishmael will make an ass of himself and will have enemies all around him, including his own family.”

“And I’ll call you Elroi,” Hagar answered in astonishment, “because you’ve apparently seen God and live to tell about it.”

After the encounter, the well of the spring was called “Beerlahairoi” or “Well of the Living One Who Sees Me.”

Hagar returned to her mistress, bore Abram a son, and named him Ishmael. Abram was eighty-six years old.

Inspiration: Genesis 16

Beauty tips

08 beauty tips

Due to a food shortage from drought, Abram decided to live in the fertile land of Egypt for awhile. As they entered the city, Abram pulled Sarai aside and said, “It’s no secret that you’re stunningly beautiful, and when the Egyptians see you, they’ll kill me to get to you.” Then Abram suggested, “Tell them I’m your brother. They’ll be all too happy to keep me alive on your account.”

As Abram predicted, everyone admired Sarai’s beauty. Egyptian officers described her features to Pharaoh, and soon Sarai found herself standing before the very god of Egypt in his own court.

Sarai became the newest installment in the royal harem, and Pharaoh treated Abram like a brother, with great hospitality and respect.

Abram acquired sheep, oxen, donkeys, camels, and slaves from Pharaoh. On the other hand, Pharaoh’s family acquired nothing but a contagious illness. Putting two and two together, Pharaoh became wise to the deception.

“What’s going on?” Pharaoh asked Abram. “Why’d you lie about Sarai being your wife? Thankfully, I never laid a hand on her. Get her out of here so your God will clear the air!”

Pharaoh’s officers escorted Abram and Sarai out of Egypt along with all the gifts he had acquired.

Inspiration: Genesis 12

Abram’s call

07 abrams call

From Shem’s family line, the Semites, came a man named Abram of Ur in Babylonia. He and his wife, Sarai, lived with his father’s tribe in Haran.

God told Abram to leave his father’s family and to head south. He said, “You’re going to be a great nation. You’ll be blessed, renowned, and you’ll be a blessing. Anyone who blesses you will be blessed, and anyone who curses you will be cursed. Because of you, every family in the world will have reason to celebrate.”

Abram took God at his word. When he was seventy-five years old, he packed his bags and loaded up his household, his nephew Lot, their livestock, and all the servants they had acquired in Haran.

Traveling through Canaan, they stopped at Moreh Grove in Shechem. God appeared to Abram and said, “This will be the land of your children.”

Abram had no children and knew his wife was barren, but he believed the promise and built an altar to God anyway.

Abram moved on a little further south into the hill country and pitched a tent. He built another altar and called on the name of God. From there, he and his small band of travelers continued due south.

Inspiration: Genesis 10-12; I Chronicles 1