I’m innocent

“How easy it is for you to come here, look at my condition, and tarnish my good name with mere assumptions,” Job answered. “If I were in your place, Eliphaz, I could do the same thing.”

He limped back to the fire circle, staff still in hand, to address the others.

“I could also soothe you with sympathy to ease your sorrow and encourage your strength.”

Job threw Eliphaz’s staff to the ground and inched closer to the fire. His body looked like one stoned with a hundred jagged rocks. The grey-green pus and blood draining from his sores comingled into jelly that glistened in the firelight.

“In his anger, God hunted me down and ripped me to shreds. He handed me over to Satan, who lurks in the shadows of my dreams and glares at my misery. God set me up as a target for my so-called friends. Without mercy, you notch your arrows and pierce me with lies.

“Yet I plead my innocence. When I die, may my racked body continue my protest. Surely my advocate is up there somewhere.

“I no longer consider you my friends. I’ll pour my heart out to God alone, believing he will listen as a friend before I exert my last breath.”

Inspiration: Job 16

Rise again?

“I’m weak,” Job said almost in a whisper. “How weak and frail are all mortals. How full of sorrow. A man flourishes for an instant, then like a spring blossom, he soon withers.

“Why are you so severe with us? Why do you demand a payment of blood for our impurities when we’re born impure?

“Why can’t you give mortals a break? Unlike the tree, we’re here for a moment, and then we die. If a tree comes down, even an ancient tree, it grows again with a little water. But cut a man down and bury him, and where’s his soul?

“Like water drying up from a lake, we lie down, never to rise again until the heavens fall. I wish you’d hide me in the grave for a time, but remember me when all is said and done. Is that wishful thinking? After we die, will we live again? The thought of it soothes my torment, giving me a strange hope in death.”

Inspiration: Job 14

Beginning’s end

Joseph wept at his father’s side and kissed his pallid face. Then he brought in his physicians and ordered them to commence with the embalming process, which took forty days. The Egyptians in Joseph’s company mourned Israel for seventy days.

Joseph returned to the palace complex and addressed Pharaoh in the presence of his household.

“If I’ve found favor in your eyes, please grant me leave so that I may bury my father with his people in the land of Canaan. I’ll return after I’ve fulfilled my oath to my father.”

“Go and bury your father with my blessing,” Pharaoh answered.

Joseph enlisted all of Pharaoh’s servants and elders, and every elder in the land to go with him. This included every male member of Joseph’s household, his father’s family, and his brothers.

The women of Israel’s household stayed behind with the children to tend the flocks and herds in Goshen.

An army of chariots escorted the retinue of hundreds. They crossed the Jordan River and stopped at the threshing floor at Atad to conduct a solemn lamentation. This time of profound sadness lasted seven days.

The Canaanite passersby observed the mourning ceremony and named the place “Abel-mizraim,” Mourning of Egypt.

When they finished the ceremony, the caravan continued on to the field at Machpelah, to the cave that Abraham purchased as a burial site for his family.

The mourners returned to their homes, and all the land was quiet.

Joseph’s brothers began to wonder if he was secretly holding a grudge against them. Realizing they’d no longer have their father to protect them, they began to worry. Gathering themselves together, they went into the city to address Joseph.

“Our father gave us a message to deliver to you before he died,” Gad said. “He said, ‘Tell Joseph to forgive you for harming him.’”

Joseph’s eyes welled up with tears. Then his brothers began to weep. “We’re here at your service, lord,” Issachar said.

Joseph shook his head and stood. “It’s true that you tried to hurt me, but God intended for this to happen for good. He caused all these things to come to pass so that I could save the entire land from death. As long as I’m alive, I’ll continue to provide for you and protect you.”

Joseph continued his post as Pharaoh’s viceroy for the remainder of his life. Before he passed away, he bid his brothers farewell.

“I’m preparing to die, but God isn’t finished with you yet. He will bring you safely to the land he swore to our great-grandfather, our grandfather, and our father. When God comes for you, collect my bones and carry them with you to the land promised to us.”

After his death, Joseph was embalmed and placed in an Egyptian sarcophagus. He lived one hundred and ten years.