Jacob’s love

Jacob continued traveling east until he came to a field where three flocks of sheep were resting by a well. Jacob asked the shepherds, “Where are you from, brothers?”

“We’re from Haran,” one of the shepherds offered.

“Do you know Laban?” Jacob asked.

“Yes,” he said.

“Look,” another shepherd pointed further east. “Here comes his daughter with Laban’s sheep.”

Jacob saw a girl approaching in the distance with a flock. He looked around at all the sheep lying around. “Why aren’t these sheep out grazing? It’s not even near nightfall. Water them quickly and get them to pasture.”

“Can’t be done,” the first shepherd said. “The stone covering the mouth of the well is too heavy. We need all the shepherds together to move it. Only then can we water the sheep.”

When Laban’s daughter Rachel was close enough for Jacob to see her beauty, he took hold of the huge boulder with both arms and rolled it away from the mouth of the well. He watered Laban’s sheep, gave Rachel a kiss, and cried in front of everyone.

“I’m your Aunt Rebekah’s son,” he said.

Rachel ran home to tell her father, and Laban ran back to meet him. They embraced, and Laban welcomed Jacob into his home.

Jacob told Laban all that had transpired over the last several days, and Laban answered, “We’re related by blood.” He thought back to a time when a servant of Jacob’s father came with riches for the hand of his sister Rebekah.

Jacob stayed with Laban for a month.

Inspiration: Genesis 29

Loyalty points

King Abimelech and his army commander Phicol came to Abraham for a little chat.

“It’s obvious God is always watching over you,” the king said, then added, “Promise me, in the presence of your God, that you’ll never betray me or my family line. After all, I’ve been loyal friend.”

“I promise,” Abraham answered, “but I should make you aware of a dispute over one of my water wells. Your servants seem to think it’s yours.”

Abimelech answered, “This is the first I’m hearing of it. Why didn’t you tell me?”

“It wasn’t a big deal.” Abraham brought Abimelech sheep and oxen, and they promised they’d be loyal to one another. Then Abraham took seven female lambs and set them apart from the rest of the fold.

“What are these for?” Abimelech asked.

“These seven lambs are given in exchange for your word that I dug the disputed well.”

They named that place “Beersheba,” Well of the Oath. After they sealed their promise, Abimelech and his commander went back to the land of the Philistines.

Abraham remained there awhile and planted a salt cedar near the well. There he spent some one-on-one time with God, and afterward, he surveyed the land of the Philistines.

Inspiration: Genesis 21